Reimagining breast cancer with three women

Reimagining breast cancer

Exploring whether breast cancer can be a single shade, when it’s not a single disease

Published 12 October 2020

Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women around the world.1 But, contrary to common belief, breast cancer is not just one disease.

There are several types of breast cancer and identifying which form a woman has is essential in tailoring the best treatment for her.

For the most part, a single shade of pink has come to represent this disease. But at Roche, we explore whether breast cancer can be a single shade, when it is not a single disease. Each woman has her own story, her own unique cancer, her own shade of pink.

We want to introduce the unique and individual stories of three women, each living with a different type of breast cancer. With their own distinct journeys, they share their stories of diagnosis, including its impact on their family and friends, but most importantly, how they’ve managed to take control of their disease and continue to live life to the fullest.

This Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we encourage everyone to take time to learn more about the different types of breast cancer and change the way we think and talk about this disease.

Rachael had her partner by her side when she was diagnosed with triple-positive breast cancer.

The first question Rachael had was whether she would be able to have children.

Hear Rachael’s personal story as she overcame challenges to have the family she always wanted, by having her own treatment plan that works best for her and her needs.

Alex felt a knot in her breast. She knew it was something, but wasn’t sure what.

Alex was diagnosed with slightly hormone positive breast cancer and HER2-negative, which soon become triple-negative breast cancer.

Hear Alex’s powerful story as she took her diagnosis as an opportunity to break down social taboos on this disease and its many types, with the help of her friends.

Ike was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer, then soon after, HER2-positive.

Ike remembers the feeling of fear of the unknown, but most importantly, a strength she’s never felt before.

Hear Ike’s touching story of how she traveled to get the treatment she needed, so that she could continue to live her life to the fullest with her husband and three boys.

alex-740

Rachael, Alex and Ike, have their own set of emotions, experiences and hopes that represent their own journeys with a different type of breast cancer, as well as their own personal approach to treatment.

Treatment options like surgery, radiotherapy, or treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapies, immunotherapy and hormonal therapies can be given depending on the type of breast cancer a woman is diagnosed with.

rachael-740

That’s why with #MyShadeofPink, Roche hopes to better educate everyone at risk of, or affected by, breast cancer to learn about the different types of the disease, so that they are empowered to have informed conversations with their doctor about a personalised treatment approach.

References

  1. Ferlay J, et al. [Online]. Available from: http://globocan.iarc.fr [Accessed September 2020].

Tags: People, Patients